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Reference Material: 12 Documents Relating to the Outcome of the Indian Prime Minister's Visit t

Full texts of 12 official documents relating to the outcome of the visit of Indian Prime Minister to China in October 2013, are given below in response to demands from viewers for providing the same for the purpose of their using them as reference material. Docuemts include texts of India-China Joint Statement, Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singhs’s address at the Party School and 10 agreements/MOUs- Director, C3S).

Documents

(1) Joint Statement- A vision for future development of India-China strategic and cooperative partnership( Issued at conclusion of the visit to China of Indian Prime Minister) October 23,2013 1. At the invitation of H.E. Mr. Li Keqiang, Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, the Prime Minister of the Republic of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh paid an official visit to China from 22-24 October 2013. Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh called on H.E. Mr. Xi Jinping, President of the People’s Republic of China and held talks with Premier Mr. Li Keqiang. He also met with H.E. Mr. Zhang Dejiang, Chairman of the National People’s Congress. 2. The two sides held wide ranging talks on bilateral, regional and international issues of common interest and reached broad consensus. Recalling the important understandings reached between leaders of the two countries this year, the two sides reaffirmed their commitment to take forward their Strategic and Cooperative Partnership for Peace and Prosperity. This would be done by following the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence [Panchsheel] and displaying mutual respect and sensitivity to each other’s concerns and aspirations. The exchange of visits by the Prime Minister of India and the Premier of China within the same calendar year was the first since 1954 and has great significance. 3. The leaders recognized that India and China are poised to enter a new stage of economic engagement based on pragmatic cooperation and mutually advantageous policies and practices. They expected the Strategic Economic Dialogue during its meeting in November/December 2013 to work out specific projects and initiatives in areas that have already been broadly agreed upon. The Joint Economic Group will continue to expand the bilateral economic cooperation and promote a balanced growth of bilateral trade. Its Working Groups will expeditiously discharge the mandate given to them in pursuit of those objectives. The two sides agreed to look into the prospects of a bilateral Regional Trade Arrangement (RTA). They will also review the state of the negotiation on the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). Efforts to conclude a framework agreement for the establishment of industrial zones to provide platforms of cluster type development for enterprises of the two countries would be expedited. Economic agreements signed at the conclusion of the talks reflect the progress made since May 2013. 4. Pursuant to the understanding reached between the two leaders in May 2013, India and China have each established a Study Group on the BCIM [Bangladesh, China, India and Myanmar] Economic Corridor. The visit of the Chinese delegation to India in this regard was noted as a positive step. Further discussions on concepts and alignment of the economic corridor are envisaged. Both India and China would continue to discuss with the other parties to this initiative, and hold the first BCIM Joint Study Group meeting in coming December to study the specific programs on building the BCIM Economic Corridor. 5. Special Representatives, who have been charged with exploring a framework of settlement of the India-China boundary question, were encouraged by the two leaders to continue their efforts in that direction. Peace and tranquility on the India-China border was recognized as an important guarantor for the development and continued growth of bilateral relations. Building on previous agreements signed in 1993, 1996 and 2005 that recognize the principle of mutual and equal security, the two countries signed a Border Defence Cooperation Agreement that will strengthen maintenance of stability on the border. 6. Defence exchanges and military exercises are important in building greater trust and confidence. The holding of a counter-terrorism exercise in November 2013 underlines the shared desire of both Governments to enhance mutual understanding. Exchanges and visits agreed upon by the Defence Ministers of the two countries in July 2013 will be implemented step by step. 7. The Indian side deeply appreciated the resources and efforts of the Chinese Government in making available data on and emergency management of the trans-border rivers. The leaders welcomed the signing of a MoU on Strengthening Cooperation on Trans-border Rivers. The two sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation and, within the Expert Level Mechanism, work together on provision of flood-season hydrological data and emergency management, and exchange views on other issues of mutual interest. 8. The shared goal of an expanded engagement requires facilitating greater people-to-people contacts and exchanges. The Program of Cultural Exchange for the years 2013-2015 which includes art and culture, cultural heritage, youth affairs, education and sports, media, publications and mass communications was also signed. This would be supported by sister-city relationships that have been concluded initially on a pilot basis. 9. In addition to marking 2014 as a Year of Friendly Exchanges, India and China will discuss with Myanmar appropriate ways of commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Five Principles of Peaceful Coexistence [Panchsheel]. 10. The two leaders discussed political and economic issues of regional and global significance, including those with a potential to affect the growth and development prospects of their respective nations. They agreed to further strengthen coordination and cooperation in multilateral forums including Russia-India-China, BRICS, and G-20 to jointly tackle global issues such as climate change, international terrorism, food and energy security, and to establish a fair and equitable international political and economic system. They encouraged the various mechanisms and dialogues covering relevant issues to meet regularly to ensure a proper appreciation of each other’s concerns and interests. 11. Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh expressed his appreciation for the warmth of his reception and the hospitality extended by the Chinese Government. He invited Premier Mr. Li Keqiang to visit India at a time of mutual convenience. (2) List of Agreements/MoUs signed between India and China during Prime Minister’s Official Visit to China (October 23, 2013)

S. No. Name of Agreement / MoU Indian Signatory Chinese Signatory Gist of Agreement / MOU 1 Agreement on Border Defence Cooperation Shri R.K. Mathur, Defence Secretary Lt. Gen.Sun Jianguo, Deputy Chief of General Staff, PLA An additional confidence building measure to ensure peace and tranquility on the border. 2 MoU on Nalanda University Smt. Sujatha Singh, Foreign Secretary Mr. Wei Wei, Ambassador of China to India Cooperation on Nalanda as part of East Asia Summit process. 3 MOU to Strengthen Cooperation on Trans-Border Rivers Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Chen Lei, Minister, Ministry of Water Resources Provides for expanded cooperation on trans-border rivers. 4 Cultural Exchange Programme 2013-15 Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Yang Zhijin, Vice Minister, Ministry of Culture A listing of cultural exchanges till 2015. 5 MoU on Cooperation in Road Transport and Highways Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Yang Chuantong, Minister, Ministry of Transport Enabling agreement for cooperation in the roads sector. 6 MoU on Power Equipment Service Centres in India Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Wu Xinxiong, Administrator, National Energy Administration Provides for establishment in India of Chinese power equipment service centres. 7 Agreement between Delhi-Beijing on Establishment of Sister City Relationship Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Li Shixiang, Vice Mayor, Beijing Municipality Establishes sister city relations between Delhi and Beijing

8 Agreement between Bengaluru – Chengdu on Establishment of Sister City Relationship Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Ge Honglin, Mayor of Chengdu Establishes sister city relations between Bengaluru and Chengdu 9 Agreement between Kolkata – Kunming on Establishment of Sister City Relationship Dr. S. Jaishankar, Ambassador of India to China Mr. Li Wenrong, Mayor of Kunming Establishes sister city relations between Kolkata and Kunming

(3) Border Defence Cooperation Agreement between India and China October 23, 2013

The Government of the Republic of India and the Government of the People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as the ‘two sides’),

Firmly believing that the India-China Strategic and Cooperative Partnership for Peace and Prosperity serves the fundamental interests of the people of the two countries,

Reiterating that neither side shall use its military capability against the other side and that their respective military strengths shall not be used to attack the other side,

Reaffirming that neither side shall use or threaten to use force against the other side by any means nor seek unilateral superiority,

Having accepted the principle of mutual and equal security,

Acknowledging the need to continue to maintain peace, stability and tranquility along the line of actual control in the India-China border areas and to continue implementing confidence building measures in the military field along the line of actual control,

Recognizing the importance of materializing the spirit of the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of India and Government of the People’s Republic of China on the Maintenance of Peace and Tranquility Along the Line of Actual Control in the India-China Border Areassigned on 7th September 1993, theAgreement between the Government of the Republic of India and the Government of the People’s Republic of China on Confidence Building Measures in the Military Field Along the Line of Actual Control in the India-China Border Areassigned on 29th November 1996, theProtocol between the Government of the Republic of India and the Government of the People’s Republic of China on Modalities for the Implementation of Confidence Building Measures in the Military Field Along the Line of Actual Control in India-China Border Areassigned on 11th April 2005 and the Agreement between the Government of the Republic of India and the Government of the People’s Republic of China on the Establishment of a Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination on India-China Border Affairssigned on 17th January 2012,

Have agreed as follows:

Article I

The two sides shall carry out border defence cooperation on the basis of their respective laws and relevant bilateral agreements.

Article II

The two sides shall implement border defence cooperation in the following ways:

1.Exchange information-including information about military exercises, aircrafts, demolition operations and unmarked mines-and take consequent measures conducive to the maintenance of peace, stability and tranquility along the line of actual control in the India-China border areas,

2.Jointly combat smuggling of arms, wildlife, wildlife articles and other contrabands,

3.Assist the other side in locating personnel, livestock, means of transport and aerial vehicles that may have crossed or are possibly in the process of crossing the line of actual control in the India-China border areas,

4.Work with the other side in combating natural disasters or infectious diseases that may affect or spread to the other side,

5.Any other way mutually agreed upon by the two sides.

Article III

Border deference cooperation visualized in this agreement shall be implemented through the following mechanisms:

1.Flag meetings or border personnel meetings at designated places along the line of actual control in the India-China border areas.

2.Periodic meetings between officers of the relevant Military Regions of China and Army Commands of India and between departments responsible for military operations.

3.Periodic meetings of the representatives of the Ministry of Defence of the Government of India and the Ministry of National Defence of the People’s Republic of China.

4.Meetings of the Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination on India-China Border Affairs.

5.Meetings of the India-China Annual Defence Dialogue.

Article IV

In implementing border defence cooperation and to facilitate contacts and meetings between relevant organizations, the two sides may establish Border Personnel Meeting sites in all sectors, as well as telephone contacts and telecommunication links at mutually agreed locations along the line of actual control. The two sides may also consider establishing a Hotline between the military headquarters of the two countries. Specific arrangements shall be decided upon through mutual consultations between the two sides.

Article V

In order to enhance understanding and cooperation between the border defence forces of the two sides, each side may invite the other side for joint celebrations on major national or military days or festivals and organize cultural activities, non-contact sports events and small scale tactical exercises along the line of actual control in the India-China border areas. In addition, the two sides may also conduct joint military training exercises, at Army level, in each other’s country on a regular basis. The theme of such joint exercises will be decided through mutual consultations.

Article VI

The two sides agree that they shall not follow or tail patrols of the other side in areas where there is no common understanding of the line of actual control in the India-China border areas.

Article VII

In case a doubtful situation arises with reference to any activity by either side in border areas where there is no common understanding of the line of actual control, either side has the right to seek a clarification from the other side. In such cases, the clarification shall be sought and replies to them shall be conveyed through any of the mechanisms established underArticle III of this Agreement.

Article VIII

The two sides agree that if the border defence forces of the two sides come to a face-to-face situation in areas where there is no common understanding of the line of actual control, both sides shall exercise maximum self-restraint, refrain from any provocative actions, not use force or threaten to use force against the other side, treat each other with courtesy and prevent exchange of fire or armed conflict.

Article IX

The two sides shall implement this Agreement without prejudice to their respective positions on the alignment of the line of actual control as well as on the boundary question.

Article X

This Agreement shall come into force on the date of its signature. It may be revised, amended or terminated with the consent of the two sides. Any revision or amendment, mutually agreed by the two sides, shall form an integral part of this Agreement.

Signed in duplicate in Hindi, Chinese and English languages at Beijing on 23rd day of October month of 2013, all three versions being equally authentic. In case of divergence, the English text shall prevail.

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(4)Memorandum of Understanding on the Establishment of Nalanda University October 23, 2013 The participating countries of the East Asia Summit comprising Brunei Darussalam, the Kingdom of Cambodia, Republic of Indonesia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Republic of the Union of Myanmar, Republic of Philippines, Republic of Singapore, Thailand, Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Australia, People’s Republic of China, Republic of India, Japan, Republic of Korea, New Zealand, the Russian Federation and the United States of America;

Desirous of establishing an international institution that will advance the concept of an Asian community by bringing together future generations in a common objective of making new discoveries of old relationships to realize a unity of minds;

Recalling that the Second East Asia Summit held on the 15th January, 2007 in the city of Cebu, Republic of Philippines, resolved to strengthen regional educational co-operation by tapping the East Asia Region’s centres of excellence in education and for the revival of Nalanda University located in the state of Bihar in India to improve regional understanding and appreciation of one another’s heritage and history;

Recalling also that the Fourth East Asia Summit held on the 25th October, 2009 in Hua Hin, Thailand, supported the establishment of Nalanda University and encouraged networking and collaboration between the proposed Nalanda University and existing centres of excellence in the participating countries of the East Asia Summit to build a community of learning where students, scholars, researchers and academicians can work together, symbolising the spirituality that unites all mankind.

Recognising that pursuant to the decisions taken at the Second East Asia Summit held on 15th January, 2007 and the Fourth East Asia Summit held on 25th October, 2009, the Government of India has established Nalanda University in the state of Bihar by an Act of Parliament entitled ‘The Nalanda University Act, 2010 (No. 39 of 2010)’, as an international institution for the pursuit of intellectual, philosophical and spiritual studies and to encourage networking and collaboration between Nalanda University and existing centres of excellence, including in the participating countries of the East Asia Summit;

Recognising also that Nalanda University will enable participating countries to build an academic community where students, scholars, researchers and academicians can collaborate in developing Nalanda University as an international centre of excellence;

Have decided as follows:

Article 1

Establishment of Nalanda University 1. An international institution known as Nalanda University (hereinafter referred to as the “University”), which will be a non-state, non-profit, self-governing international institution is established to achieve the purposes set forth in this Memorandum of Understanding and it will have full academic freedom for the attainment of its objectives. 2. The University will be located at Rajgir in Nalanda District in the state of Bihar in India (hereinafter referred to as the “Host Country”). 3. The University will have full legal personality in the Host Country. 4. The University will have the power to confer degrees, diplomas and certificates. Article 2 Objectives and Functions of Nalanda University The objectives and functions of the University will include the following: 1. To establish an international institution of learning that will bring together the brightest and the most dedicated students from all countries irrespective of gender, caste, creed, disability, ethnicity or socio-economic background and to give them the means needed for the pursuit of intellectual, philosophical, historical and spiritual studies and thus achieve qualities of tolerance, accommodation and mutual understanding; 2. To build an Asian community of learning where the intellectual potential of every student can be developed to the fullest extent possible, and to create an Asian community by strengthening regional awareness; 3. To impart education towards capacity-building of Asian nations in the domain of philosophy, language, history and other areas of higher learning vital for improving the quality of their life and those of their brethren; and 4. To contribute to the promotion of regional peace and vision by bringing together future leaders who by relating to their past history can enhance their understanding of each other’s perspectives. Article 3

Funding The funding for the establishment and operations of the University will be on a voluntary basis. Article 4

Governance Structure 1. The University will be governed by a Governing Board. The President of India will be the Visitor of the University. 2. The members of the Governing Board will be drawn from amongst distinguished persons from India and abroad. The membership of the Governing Board will include five representatives from participating countries of the East Asia Summit to enhance their role in developing Nalanda University as an international institution of excellence. 3. The Governing Board will be responsible for the overall policies and directions of the University. The powers and functions of the Governing Board will be as per the Statutes of the University. 4. The University will be headed by a Vice-Chancellor appointed by the Governing Board. The appointment, tenure, powers and functions of the Vice-Chancellor will be as per the Statutes and Ordinances of the University. Article 5

Fiscal Status The University, its assets, income and other property, in the host country, will be: 1. Exempt from all direct taxes. However, the University will not claim exemption from taxes which are in fact no more than charges for public utility services; 2. Exempt from customs duties and prohibitions and restrictions on imports and exports in respect of articles imported or exported by the University for its official use, subject to the provisions of pertinent laws, rules and regulations, and provided that articles imported under such exemptions will be disposed of in accordance with local laws of the HostCountry; and 3. Exempt from customs duties and prohibitions and restrictions on imports and exports in respect of its publications. Article 6

Privileges and Immunities The University, the Vice Chancellor and its academic staff, and where applicable their dependents and members of the family, will be accorded such privileges and immunities in the Host Country as provided in the Headquarters Agreement signed between Nalanda University and the Government of India. Article 7

Visa and Work Permits

The Host Country will provide appropriate visas to the students, faculty and staff for travel to India to study or work in the University. Article 8

Settlement of Disputes

Any issue concerning interpretation or implementation of this Memorandum of Understanding shall be settled through mutual consultations. Article9

Final Provisions 1. The Memorandum of Understanding will come into effect upon signature by four participating countries of the East Asia Summit. 2. After the coming into effect of this Memorandum of Understanding, any participating country of the East Asia Summit or any other State that subscribes to the object and purpose of the establishment of Nalanda University may, as appropriate, become a signatory to this Memorandum of Understanding. Signed at Beijing, China on the 23rdday of October, 2013 in the English language.

(Sujatha Singh) Foreign Secretary Ministry of External Affairs (Wei Wei) Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of the People’s Republic of China to India

(5) Press Information Bureau Government of India Prime Minister’s Office 23-October-2013 10:36 IST MoU between the Ministry of Water Resources, India and the Ministry of Water Resources, China on strengthening cooperation on trans-border rivers

The Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India and the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China (hereafter referred to as the “parties”),

Recalling the Working Regulations of the Expert Level Mechanism on Trans-border Rivers between the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of India of April 2008, the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Langqen Zangbo/Sutlej River in Flood Season by China to India of December 2010, the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River in Flood Season by China to India of May 2013, and the Joint Statement between the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of India of May 2013,

Have reached the following understanding:

1. The two sides recognized that trans-border rivers and related natural resources and the environment are assets of immense value to the socio-economic development of all riparian countries.

2. Both sides agreed that cooperation on trans-border rivers will further enhance mutual strategic trust and communication as well as strengthen the strategic and cooperative partnership. The two sides appreciated the role and importance of the Expert Level Mechanism on Trans-border Rivers between China and India.

3. The Indian side expressed appreciation to China for providing flood-season hydrological data and the assistance in emergency management.

4. The Chinese side agreed to extend the data provision period of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River, which was agreed upon in the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River in Flood Season by China to India of May 2013 from 2014, that is to start from May 15th instead of June 1st to October 15th of the relevant year. The two sides shall implement this in accordance with related Implementation Plan. The Indian side expressed appreciation to the Chinese side in this regard.

5. The two sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation on trans-border rivers, cooperate through the existing Expert Level Mechanism on provision of flood-season hydrological data and emergency management, and exchange views on other issues of mutual interest.

This Memorandum of Understanding will enter into force upon signature and can be amended and modified with mutual agreement. ***

(6) Prime Minister’s speech at the Central Party School in Beijing – India and China in the New Era Following is the text of the Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh’s speech at the Central Party School in Beijing today:

“I am deeply honoured at this invitation to speak at the Central Party School of the Communist Party of China. Ladies and Gentlemen, I am conscious of the unique place that this School holds in the governance system of contemporary China and its contribution to the remarkable transformation of Chinese society. Many of you will play a decisive role in shaping China’s future development, which will be of great significance for Asia and the world.

I can think of no better place than this School to speak about India and China in the new era.

Relations between India and China are unique in the world. We are two continuous ancient civilizations. We are neighbours with a long history of cultural, spiritual and economic ties. We both embarked on a new phase of our political histories around the same time. Today, we are the world’s two most populous nations, engaged in a process of socio-economic transformation of our people on a scale and at a pace unprecedented in human history.

Both our countries have achieved considerable success in this endeavour. Indeed, China’s early economic reforms and impressive achievements are a source of inspiration across the developing world. After China, India has been the fastest growing major economy in the world, averaging a growth rate of 7% per year over the past two decades and around 8% per year during the past ten years. As a result, both our economies have expanded several times. We have achieved a high degree of economic modernization and have lifted hundreds of millions of our people out of the clutches of poverty.

In our own ways, we have also had an impact in shaping the global economy – China in the manufacturing sector and India in the services sector.

Over the past two decades, the process of economic reforms in India has gone through the rigour of democratic debate, and met the test of political consensus and public support. India’s policies have focused not only on accelerating growth, but also on making it sustainable and regionally balanced. We have emphasized not only modernization, but also addressing the challenges of opportunities, capacity and equity for our vast and diverse population. This is the path on which we will continue to move forward.

In structural terms, India’s growth is propelled by domestic demand and financed largely by our own resources. But we are also increasingly integrated into the global economy. The prolonged global economic crisis has affected us, as it has many other emerging economies. I believe, however, that this is a temporary disruption. In recent months, we have taken measures to enhance foreign investment flows, speed up implementation of major projects, boost infrastructure development, strengthen our financial markets, reform our tax system and make our business environment more attractive.

Our effort is to return the Indian economy to a sustained growth rate of 7-8% per annum. We believe that the underlying fundamentals of our economy, particularly investment and savings rates, are strong and consistent with this projection.

India’s critical challenges in the days ahead are precisely in areas where I see opportunities for cooperation between India and China and I would like to highlight eight specific areas in this regard.

One, we need to pay much greater attention to the expansion and modernization of our infrastructure.

India plans to invest one trillion U.S. dollars in infrastructure in the next five years and we would welcome China’s expertise and investment in this sector.

Two, we need to increase our agricultural productivity in order to reduce rural-urban disparities in income and manage efficiently the process of mass urbanization, which is a phenomenon common to both our countries. This will mean paying particular attention to the issues of water and waste management.

China has significant experience of urbanization and our national planners, city administrators and entrepreneurs should share experiences and seek solutions in dealing with the physical, social, environmental and human challenges of mobility and urbanization.

Three, we want to draw upon China’s strength in the manufacturing sector, which is vital for providing mass employment. India, for its part, has strength in services, innovation and certain manufacturing sectors, which can benefit China. A linked challenge for India is in skill development, where we can learn from each other’s experience.

Four, as large and growing consumers of energy, we should intensify cooperation on the shared challenges of energy security, including joint development of renewable energy resources, as well as working jointly with third countries.

Five, growing population, shrinking land, improving consumption levels and price volatility make food security a key policy priority for us. India has launched a major legislation-based food security programme. Our two countries should pool our resources and expertise in this area.

More broadly, in an uncertain global environment, India and China can work together to impart stability to the global economy and sustain growth in our two economies by leveraging our resources, large unsaturated demand, economies of scale and our growing income levels.

Six, in an integrated world, economic success requires a favourable external environment. In recent decades, India and China have been among the greatest beneficiaries of an open global economy; a rule-based and open international trade regime; and free flow of finance, information and technology.

However, the emerging global environment may not remain as favourable as it has been in recent decades. We should therefore work together to make the international economic environment more conducive to our development efforts. Please allow me to elaborate this point.

After the prolonged global economic crisis of 2008, we face a fundamentally different future for the world economy. We are in the midst of a significant and ongoing transformation where both political and economic power is being diffused. A multi-polar world is emerging but its contours are not yet clear.

Protectionist sentiments in the West have increased and the global trading regime may become fragmented by regional arrangements among major countries. India and China have a vital stake in preserving an open, integrated and stable global trade regime even as we work together to foster regional economic integration. We should also intensify our efforts to support trade and investment and reduce risks in emerging markets. The BRICS Development Bank and the Contingency Reserve Arrangement are examples of such cooperative efforts. Our cooperation will also help accelerate reforms in global financial institutions.

Seven, while we welcome and celebrate the rapid economic growth of our economies, we must also confront the challenges of climate change and focus greater attention on the safeguarding of our fragile environment. Both India and China are heirs to civilizations that value Nature and have practiced sustainability through the ages. However, as we meet the basic needs of our people, we also face the danger of unfair burdens being imposed on us for mitigating climate change. We should ensure that the international response to climate change does not constrain our growth and that it continues to be based on the principle of common but differentiated responsibilities.

Eight, India and China have also benefited from a largely stable global order and peaceful periphery. But we cannot take a stable political and security environment in our region and beyond for granted. If we look carefully, many of our challenges are common. Terrorism, extremism and radicalism emanating from our neighbourhood affect both of us directly and can create instability across Asia. Similarly, maritime security in the Pacific and Indian Oceans is vital for our economies just as peace and stability in West Asia and Gulf are essential for our energy security.

Above all, India and China need a stable, secure and prosperous Asia Pacific region. The centre of gravity of global opportunities and challenges are shifting to this region. In the coming decades, China and India, together with the United States, Japan, Korea and the ASEAN Community, will be among the largest economies in the world. While this region embodies unparalleled dynamism and hope, it is also one with unsettled questions and unresolved disputes. It will be in our mutual interest to work for a cooperative, inclusive and rule-based security architecture that enhances our collective security and regional and global stability.

While both India and China are large and confident enough to manage their security challenges on their own, we can be more effective if we work together. Regional stability and prosperity will also gain from stronger connectivity in the Asia-Pacific region. This should be a shared enterprise of India and China.

I have said on several occasions that India welcomes China’s emergence. Frankly, old theories of alliances and containment are no longer relevant. India and China cannot be contained and our recent history is testimony to this. Nor should we seek to contain others.

We both know that the benefits of cooperation far outweigh any presumed gains from containment. Therefore, we should engage with each other in a spirit of equality and friendship and with the confidence that neither country is a threat to the other. This is the essential premise of India’s external engagement. Our strategic partnerships with other countries are defined by our own economic interests, needs and aspirations. They are not directed against China or anyone else. We expect a similar approach from China.

The landmark visit of Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi to China 25 years ago marked a new beginning in our relationship. Since then, successive leaders in our two countries have built on that historic opening. Over this period, our relationship has prospered and our cooperation has expanded across a broad spectrum of areas. This is because we have managed our differences and have, in general, kept our border regions tranquil. At the same time, we continue to make progress in resolving our border dispute. Having agreed to the Political Parameters and Guiding Principles, we are now discussing a Framework for a fair, reasonable and mutually acceptable boundary settlement.

This stability in our relationship has created the basic conditions for our two countries to exploit the opportunities created by our economic growth and opening. Indeed, the most dynamic area of our relationship has been economic and China has emerged as one of India’s largest economic partners.

Naturally, there are also concerns on both sides – whether it is incidents in the border region, trans-border rivers or trade imbalances.

Our recent experiences have shown that these issues can become impediments to the full exploitation of the opportunities for bilateral and multilateral cooperation between India and China, which is important for the continuing progress and transformation of our two countries.

I believe that our two countries not only share a common destiny, but that we have unlimited possibilities for closer cooperation. Let me therefore outline seven practical principles of engagement that I believe will set India and China on this course.

One, we should reaffirm an unwavering commitment to the principles of Panchsheel and conduct our relationship in a spirit of mutual respect, sensitivity to each other’s interests and sovereignty, and mutual and equal security. India has welcomed President Xi Jinping’s concept of a new type of great power relations. This is a contemporary development of the Panchsheel or Five Principles of Peaceful Co-existence, elaborated by Prime Minister Nehru and Premier Zhou Enlai in the 1950s. It highlights, in a modern context, the need for creating inter-state relations among major powers, based on mutual trust, sensitivity to each other’s core concerns and a commitment to resolve all outstanding issues through peaceful dialogue. We should develop our relations on the basis of these principles.

Two, maintaining peace and tranquility in the India-China border areas has been the cornerstone of our relations. It is essential for mutual confidence and for the expansion of our relations. We should do nothing to disturb that. Indeed, we can achieve it by adhering to our agreements and utilizing our bilateral mechanisms effectively. At the same time, we should move quickly to resolve our boundary issue.

Three, we should increase consultations and cooperation on complex issues such as trans-border rivers and our trade imbalance so as to strengthen our strategic and cooperative partnership.

Four, we should maintain a high level of strategic communication and consultations, in a spirit of transparency, on our region and our periphery, eliminating misunderstanding between our two countries and building experience of positive cooperation. As the two largest countries in Asia, our strategic consultation and cooperation will enhance peace, stability and security in our region and beyond.

Five, our convergence on a broad range of global issues should lead to enhanced policy coordination on regional and global affairs and cooperation in regional and multilateral forums in the political, economic and security domains.

Six, we should harness the full potential of cooperation in all aspects of our relationship, including in the economic area.

And finally, we will achieve much greater success in our relations by increasing contacts and familiarity between our people in every walk of life.

Like a beautiful tangram that emerges from seven different shapes, these seven principles would together create a beautiful tapestry of India-China relations in the years ahead.

I am pleased that the agreements that we have signed yesterday will help to advance many of these shared principles. As officials who will determine public policy, I hope you will do everything to advance our cooperation and promote India-China relations from your positions of responsibility.

Before I conclude, let me recall what I have often said that the world is large enough to accommodate the development aspirations of both India and China.

In my meeting with President Xi yesterday, he echoed this thought when he said that the Chinese and Indian dreams for becoming strong, developed and prosperous nations are inter-connected and mutually compatible. My meetings with President Xi and Premier Li give me great confidence that we can fulfill this noble vision. More than ever before, the world needs both countries to prosper together. We were not destined to be rivals, and we should show determination to become partners. Our future should be defined by cooperation and not by confrontation. It will not be easy, but we must spare no effort.

What is at stake is the future of India and China; indeed, what may be at stake is the future of our region and our world.

I thank you for your attention.” ***

(7) Memorandum of Understanding between Ministry of Power, Government of the Republic of India and The National Energy Administration, Government of the People’s Republic of China on setting up Chinese Power Equipment Service Centres in India

The Ministry of Power of the Government of the Republic of India and the National Energy Administration of the Government of the People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as “the Parties”)

Desirous of further strengthening and deepening cooperation in the energy sector under the India-China Strategic Economic Dialogue (hereinafter referred to as the SED) mechanism,

Noting that energy cooperation and the proposal for setting up Chinese Power Equipment Service Centres (hereinafter referred to as “PESCs”) in India was discussed at the SED Working Group Meeting on Energy that took place in Beijing on September 26, 2013.

Acknowledging that India has become a strategic market for Chinese power equipment manufacturers and that 18 GW of thermal power projects were commissioned under India’s 11th Five Year plan using Chinese-manufactured equipment and about 40 GW of power projects are currently under construction using Chinese-made equipment.

1. Sharing the common understanding that setting up of the PESCs in India would enable render timely service to plant owners, help optimize maintenance & operation costs, and eliminate risks where possible from outage maintenance cycles.

Affirming the mutual benefit of enhanced cooperation in the area of energy cooperation under the laws and regulations of both India and China, and within the framework of cooperative, complimentary, equal, and win-win principles.

Have reached the following understanding:

1.1 The Parties recognized that large number of Chinese-made power equipment has been installed/or currently being installed in India

1.2 The Parties acknowledge that requisite provision for timely and unhindered availability of spares and service support is important and necessary for reliable and economic plant operation over the operating life and to improve plant utilization rates. It has been agreed that the National Energy Administration of the People’s Republic of China would actively encourage Chinese equipment manufacturers who have supplied power equipment including power generating equipment to India companies to set up PESCs in India. The form and scope of service will be decided by equipment supplier and project owner on market principles.

1.3 This Memorandum of Understanding is intended to define general ways of cooperation between the Parties to establish the said PESCs in India

Article 2: Cooperation Programme

2.1 The Parties agreed for setting up of Power Equipment Service Centres (PESCs) in India by the Chinese suppliers/manufacturers themselves or through some suitable mechanism. The service centres would be adequately provided with equipment, personnel, spares and other facilities so as to enable them to provide all requisite spars and services support within India.

2.2 The PESCs will be set up in India on market principles. The costs and terms of servicing power equipment will be decided between the PESCs and the end user.

2.3 Parties agree to establish Sub-group comprising of related Government agencies and companies to facilitate as well as review the progress of setting up of the PESCs.

2.4 The companies will make themselves fully conversant with the relevant rules/regulations/statutes/approvals and processes being applicable for setting up of such PESCs in India.

2.5 The PESCs would be directly responsible for provision of requisite services to the Indian power generating companies on mutually acceptable terms and conditions (between the PESCs and the Indian power generating companies) and in accordance with applicable Indian laws/rules/statutes and this MoU shall not in any-way confer any special or preferential status/treatment to the PESCs.

Article 3: Settlement of Disputes

3.1 Any dispute arising between the parties in regard to interpretation and application of the present Memorandum shall be settled through friendly consultation by the Parties.

Article 4: Entry into force, duration and Termination

4.1 The MoU takes effect on the date of its signature by both Parties and will remain in force for five (5) years, if neither side gives notice to amend or terminate this Memorandum at least two months prior to the expiry date.

4.2 The PESCs may enter into contracts with Indian project owner for provision of related spares and services on such terms and conditions as may be agreeable between them. The contracts entered into may exceed the term of this Memorandum.

4.3 The Memorandum may also be amended by mutual consent. *****

NK/LM 8.Memorandum of Understanding between the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways of the Republic of India and the Ministry of Transport of the People’s Republic of China on cooperation in roads and road transportation

The Ministry of Road Transport and Highways of the Republic of India and the Ministry of Transport of the People’s Republic of China, herein after referred to as the ‘Participants’,

Recognizing the significant mutual benefit that can be derived by the Participants from cooperation on roads and road transportation matters;

Recognizing the common objective of developing and promoting safe, efficient, cost effective and sustainable road transportation systems;

Recognizing the importance of roads and road transportation in the economic development process of each Participant country, within their respective national policy framework;

Have reached the following understanding:

Article 1

Principles and Objectives of Cooperation

1. Under the framework of this Memorandum of Understanding (‘Memorandum’), the Participants will undertake cooperation on the basis of equality, reciprocity and mutual benefit.

2. The purpose of this Memorandum is to establish a long-term and effective relationship of communication and cooperation in Roads and Road Transportation.

Article 2

Definitions

For the purpose of this Memorandum,

a. ‘Road ‘ means the National Highways of the respective countries.

b. ‘Road Transportation’ means transportation of both passengers and goods by road but excludes urban transport.

Article 3

Areas of Cooperation

The Participants will cooperate in the fields of roads and road transportation in the following areas:

a. Exchange and sharing of knowledge and cooperation in the areas of transportation technology, transport policy, for passenger and freight movement by roads;

b. Planning, administration and management of road infrastructure, technology and standards for roads/highways construction and maintenance;

c. Sharing of information and best practices for developing road safety plans and road safety intervention strategies, and outreach activities aimed at reducing deaths and injuries resulting from road accidents, through:

(i) Exchange and sharing of knowledge in Intelligent Transport System; (ii) Sharing of information and best practices on increasing vehicle safety oversight, and safety fitness framework for the vehicle testing and certification system;

d. Sharing of knowledge and best practices in user fee (toll) related issues; including the modern system, technologies and methods of levying of user fee and collection including Electronic Toll Collection System;

e. Sharing of information in areas of improved technologies and materials in road and bridge construction, including joint research;

f. Sharing the experience on contractual frameworks, financing and procurement issues, particularly related to Public Private Partnerships (PPP) mode;

g. Any other area of bi-lateral cooperation, mutually agreed by the Participants.

Article 4

Ways of cooperation

1. The cooperation under this Memorandum will be carried out through the following ways:

a. Consultations at expert level about specific cooperation issues upon the requests of the Participants;

b. Organizing exchange visits for technical experts;

c. Organizing technical exchanges by way of joint organization of workshops/ seminars/conferences, etc;

d. Exchange of relevant technical materials in accordance with the provisions of the respective laws and regulations and information of policies, laws and regulations;

e. Mutual provision of information relating to transport infrastructure construction projects in their own country;

f. To undertake relevant scientific and technical research in the institutes from both countries including joint research in the identified areas of cooperation.

g. Any other method of cooperation as mutually agreed upon.

2. Whenever necessary, the Participants will discuss and jointly determine the detailed arrangement of the cooperation activities specified in Paragraph 1 of this Article.

Article 5

Implementation

1. Coordination Organizations:

International Cooperation Wing of the Ministry of Road Transport and Highways of the Republic of India and Department of International Cooperation of the Ministry of Transport of the People’s Republic of China will carry out the coordination of activities under this Memorandum;

2. Implementation Mechanism:

a. The Participants agree to constitute a Joint Working Group (JWG) to oversee the implementation of this Memorandum and to identify specific cooperation activities and services under this Memorandum.

b. The JWG will deal with all questions related to the implementation of this Memorandum and resolve the difficulties that might arise in the course of implementation of this Memorandum.

c. The members of this JWG will be nominated by the Participants. The JWG will meet, as per mutual agreement, alternately in China and in India.

d. Where possible and appropriate, the Participants will facilitate the involvement of other institutions and organizations in the cooperation activities under this Memorandum, both in the government and private sectors.

Article 6

Costs

The Participants agreed that each government shall bear its own administrative costs for the implementation of this Memorandum. Specific financial procedures will be negotiated for certain cooperation activities as needed. Any contract or separate detailed arrangements for such activities will be jointly determined by the Participants.

Article 7

Publicity

1. The Participants agreed that prior approval shall be sought of the other participant before the use of any publicity or presentational material by any of the Participants and executive agencies as are allowed to participate under Article 4 of this Memorandum.

2. Scientific and Technical information of a non-proprietary nature derived from the cooperative activities conducted under this Memorandum may be made available to the public through customary channels and, in accordance with, the normal procedures of the Participants, and other governmental entities involved in the cooperative activities.

Article 8

Confidentiality

Information and documentation received by either of the Participants as a result of cooperation under this Memorandum within their respective regulatory and legislative framework will not be given to a third party without the prior written consent of the originator. The Participants accept that either Participant may be subject to legal obligations concerning the disclosure of information relating to this Memorandum within their respective regulatory and legislative framework but will nonetheless ensure the other Participant is informed prior to any disclosure subject to the provisions for ‘Confidentiality’ under this Memorandum, wherever applicable.

Article 9

Disputes

Any dispute about the interpretation or application of this Memorandum will be resolved by consultations between the Participants, and will not be referred to any national or international tribunal or third party for settlement. If the Participants are unable to resolve the dispute, either Participant may terminate this Memorandum in accordance with Article 11 or such shorter period as may be decided between the Participants.

Article 10

Nature of the Memorandum

1. This Memorandum is not legally binding on either of the Participants.

2. This Memorandum will not generate any public/international law obligations for the Participants.

3. All activities developed under this Memorandum are subject to existing laws and regulations of the respective country of the Participants, and to the availability of necessary funds and resources.

Article11

Entry into Force, Validity, Termination, Interpretation and Amendment

The Participants agree to the following provisions:

1. Entry into Force :

This Memorandum shall enter into force on the date of its signature and will remain valid for a period of five years and shall be extended by another five years, upon their mutual written consent, at least six(6) months before expiry of the validity of this Memorandum.

2. Amendment to the Memorandum:

This Memorandum may be amended by mutual written consent of the Participants. Any amendments thereto shall enter into force on the date of signing of such consent.

3. Termination Provision:

a. The Memorandum may be terminated by either of the Participants at any time by giving sixty (60) days advance written notice to the other Participant.

b. Unless otherwise agreed in written form, the termination of this MOU shall not affect the validity of any ongoing project or activity implemented in accordance with this Memorandum.

c. The Participants will determine how the outstanding matters should be dealt with on the basis of mutual consultation. *****

(9) Agreement on the establishment of sister city relations between Bangaluru, Republic of India and Chengdu, People’s Republic of China

Bengaluru, Republic of India and Chengdu, People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as the Parties),

Recalling the Agreement between the Ministry of External Affairs, Republic of India and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, People’s Republic of China to facilitate cooperation and linkages between Indian and Chinese cities & states/ provinces, signed in New Delhi on 20 May 2013 to facilitate closer cooperation between the local authorities of India and China;

In furtherance of their desire to promote closer engagement in the fields of public policy, education, health, science and technology, tourism and culture;

1. Have agreed as follows:

i. To establish sister-city relations and create mechanisms for its implementation; ii. To maintain regular contacts including between the designated authorities; iii. To carry out cooperation in the fields of education, culture, sports, youth affairs, urban planning, waste water management, infrastructure, environment, public health and exchange of trade and commercial delegations; iv. To the above ends, undertake exchanges involving delegations; interaction between institutions; and sharing of experiences in areas of mutual interest.

2. This Agreement does not create binding obligations among the Parties. Nothing in this Agreement precludes either of the Parties from exercising any measures and satisfying any obligations prescribed under the laws of their respective jurisdiction.

3. The activities would be undertaken in prior consultation with the respective national agencies; namely, the East Asia Division of the Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India and China International Friendship Cities Association (CIFCA).

4. The Parties will ensure that financial resources to support exchanges and activities are available prior to undertaking them. As a general practice, the sending Party will bear costs of international travel, lodging and boarding, while the receiving Party will offer local transportation.

5. This Agreement shall come into effect on the date of signature by the Parties and shall remain in force for a period of five years, unless either Party gives a written notice to the other Party, of its intention to terminate the Agreement, at least three (3) months in advance. The termination of this Agreement shall not affect completion of the projects that are already in progress. Thereafter, the Parties may, through friendly consultation, enter into a fresh Agreement for a further period of five years.

6. Any dispute arising out of the interpretation, applications or implementation of any provision of this Agreement shall be settled amicably through consultation or negotiation between the Parties. *****

(10) Agreement on the establishment of Sister City Relations between Delhi, Republic of India and Beijing, People’s Republic of China

Delhi, Republic of India and Beijing, People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as the Parties),

Recalling the Agreement between the Ministry of External Affairs, Republic of India and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, People’s Republic of China to facilitate cooperation and linkages between Indian and Chinese cities & states/ provinces, signed in New Delhi on 20 May 2013 to facilitate closer cooperation between the local authorities of India and China;

In furtherance of their desire to promote closer engagement in the fields of public policy, education, health, science and technology, tourism and culture;

1. Have agreed as follows:

i. To establish sister-city relations and create mechanisms for its implementation; ii. To maintain regular contacts including between the designated authorities; iii. To carry out cooperation in the fields of education, culture, sports, youth affairs, urban planning, waste water management, infrastructure, environment, public health and exchange of trade and commercial delegations; iv. To the above ends, undertake exchanges involving delegations; interaction between institutions; and sharing of experiences in areas of mutual interest.

2. This Agreement does not create binding obligations among the Parties. Nothing in this Agreement precludes either of the Parties from exercising any measures and satisfying any obligations prescribed under the laws of their respective jurisdiction.

3. The activities would be undertaken in prior consultation with the respective national agencies; namely, the East Asia Division of the Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India and China International Friendship Cities Association (CIFCA).

4. The Parties will ensure that financial resources to support exchanges and activities are available prior to undertaking them. As a general practice, the sending Party will bear costs of international travel, lodging and boarding, while the receiving Party will offer local transportation.

5. This Agreement shall come into effect on the date of signatureby the Parties and shall remain in force for a period of five years, unless either Party gives a written notice to the other Party, of its intention to terminate the Agreement, at least three (3) months in advance. The termination of this Agreement shall not affect completion of the projects that are already in progress. Thereafter, the Parties may, through friendly consultation, enter into a fresh Agreement for a further period of five years.

6. Any dispute arising out of the interpretation, applications or implementation of any provision of this Agreement shall be settled amicably through consultation or negotiation between the Parties. *****

(11)

Agreement on the establishment of Sister City Relations between Kolkata, Republic of India and Kunming, People’s Republic of China

Kolkata, Republic of India and Kunming, People’s Republic of China (hereinafter referred to as the Parties),

Recalling the Agreement between the Ministry of External Affairs, Republic of India and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, People’s Republic of China to facilitate cooperation and linkages between Indian and Chinese cities & states/ provinces, signed in New Delhi on 20 May 2013 to facilitate closer cooperation between the local authorities of India and China;

In furtherance of their desire to promote closer engagement in the fields of public policy, education, health, science and technology, tourism and culture;

1. Have agreed as follows:

i. To establish sister-city relations and create mechanisms for its implementation; ii. To maintain regular contacts including between the designated authorities; iii. To carry out cooperation in the fields of education, culture, sports, youth affairs, urban planning, waste water management, infrastructure, environment, public health and exchange of trade and commercial delegations; iv. To the above ends, undertake exchanges involving delegations; interaction between institutions; and sharing of experiences in areas of mutual interest.

2. This Agreement does not create binding obligations among the Parties. Nothing in this Agreement precludes either of the Parties from exercising any measures and satisfying any obligations prescribed under the laws of their respective jurisdiction.

3. The activities would be undertaken in prior consultation with the respective national agencies; namely, the East Asia Division of the Ministry of External Affairs, Government of India and China International Friendship Cities Association (CIFCA).

4. The Parties will ensure that financial resources to support exchanges and activities are available prior to undertaking them. As a general practice, the sending Party will bear costs of international travel, lodging and boarding, while the receiving Party will offer local transportation.

5. This Agreement shall come into effect on the date of signature by the Parties and shall remain in force for a period of five years, unless either Party gives a written notice to the other Party, of its intention to terminate the Agreement, at least three (3) months in advance. The termination of this Agreement shall not affect completion of the projects that are already in progress. Thereafter, the Parties may, through friendly consultation, enter into a fresh Agreement for a further period of five years.

6. Any dispute arising out of the interpretation, applications or implementation of any provision of this Agreement shall be settled amicably through consultation or negotiation between the Parties. ***** (12) MoU between the Ministry of Water Resources, India and the Ministry of Water Resources, China on strengthening cooperation on trans-border rivers

The Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India and the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China (hereafter referred to as the “parties”),

Recalling the Working Regulations of the Expert Level Mechanism on Trans-border Rivers between the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of India of April 2008, the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Langqen Zangbo/Sutlej River in Flood Season by China to India of December 2010, the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River in Flood Season by China to India of May 2013, and the Joint Statement between the People’s Republic of China and the Republic of India of May 2013,

Have reached the following understanding:

1. The two sides recognized that trans-border rivers and related natural resources and the environment are assets of immense value to the socio-economic development of all riparian countries.

2. Both sides agreed that cooperation on trans-border rivers will further enhance mutual strategic trust and communication as well as strengthen the strategic and cooperative partnership. The two sides appreciated the role and importance of the Expert Level Mechanism on Trans-border Rivers between China and India.

3. The Indian side expressed appreciation to China for providing flood-season hydrological data and the assistance in emergency management.

4. The Chinese side agreed to extend the data provision period of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River, which was agreed upon in the MOU between the Ministry of Water Resources, the People’s Republic of China and the Ministry of Water Resources, the Republic of India upon Provision of Hydrological Information of the Yaluzangbu/Brahmaputra River in Flood Season by China to India of May 2013 from 2014, that is to start from May 15th instead of June 1st to October 15th of the relevant year. The two sides shall implement this in accordance with related Implementation Plan. The Indian side expressed appreciation to the Chinese side in this regard.

5. The two sides agreed to further strengthen cooperation on trans-border rivers, cooperate through the existing Expert Level Mechanism on provision of flood-season hydrological data and emergency management, and exchange views on other issues of mutual interest.

This Memorandum of Understanding will enter into force upon signature and can be amended and modified with mutual agreement.

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